A Social Model of Neurodiversity at Work

People often ask whether autism (or another neurodivergent condition) is a disability. I’d argue that it is more helpful to ask whether autistic people are disabled (to which my answer would be: in most cases, yes). It may seem a semantic distinction, but it is important: it locates the disablement not in the autistic person’s brain, but in the society they live in and the way the individual and society interact. Autism is not our disability: it may be an impairment, a difference, or some combination. Our disability is the difficulty that arises in our interaction with the specific society in which we live.

A Social Model of Neurodiversity at Work

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Erin Manning videos and podcasts

Podcast episodes:

http://unprojects.org.au/magazine/issues/issue-10-1/Sophia-Dacy-Cole-interviews-Erin-Manning-web-only/

https://poddtoppen.se/podcast/1440972495/remember-your-body/erin-manning-and-brian-massumi-on-critical-somatic-individualisation-and-why-we-need-more-movement-in-university-education-and-architecture

S02 Episode 03: Brian Massumi and Erin Manning on the economic challenge to collectively reorganize how we value money

https://thefunambulist.net/podcast/erin-manning-what-can-a-body-do

Videos:

Text:

Histories of Violence: Neurodiversity and the Policing of the Norm