Ask an Autistic: 10 Considerations You Should Know Now (Not Tomorrow)

 10 Considerations for the Autistic Workforce

1 Anxiety

2 Sensory Processing

3 Communication

4 Socializing

5 Misunderstood and Misinterpretations

6 Knowing What to Expect and Order

7 Feedback

8 Over Work/Under Work

9 Silence and Alone Time

10 Processing Spoken and Written Information

[…]

In no way ought autism hiring initiatives be taken lightly.  And in no way should the reality of autistics’ true life challenges be underplayed, overlooked, or put off as an initiative for another day.

Ask an Autistic: 10 Considerations You Should Know Now (Not Tomorrow)

Neurodiversity Hiring Initiatives: Are They Failing Autistics?

How we are failing autistics through autism hiring initiatives:

Using and misrepresenting a marginalized minority.  Creating a disabled people campaign to increase a company’s brand awareness and appeal to investors and clients.  Repeatedly depicting stereotypical autistic Caucasian male who is tech savvy, and not depicting autistics of color, LBGTQ autistics, and autistics across the gender and age spectrum.  No representation of autistic individuals who are nonverbal/mute or physically disabled.

Promoting the (stereotypical) strengths of autistic for public relations, without addressing autistics challenges, and how challenges affect job performance and job retention and quality of work life.  Not publicly sharing the pitfalls and dangers of diversity hiring initiatives, such as employee turnover, employee depression, employee isolation, and employee suicide, nor offering ideas and solutions to these pitfalls.

• Limited support once an autistic sets foot through the workplace door.  The at-risk autistics, with coexisting conditions of PTSD, mood disorders, and suicidal thoughts, being swept into the workplace without forethought to how they might respond, what supports will be needed.

• Discrimination in equal representation and opportunity: Disabled population as low wage earners, while high wage earners are not disabled.  Management positions frequented by non-autistics employees, while employees on the autism spectrum are in lower-tiered positions.  Not having any autistics on the advisory board or board of directors.  Not making job opportunities for autistics available in the fields of leadership, human relations, and communication.

Neurodiversity Hiring Initiatives: Are They Failing Autistics?